Compared to intermittent fasting, calorie restriction might be more effective for weight loss.

A lot of weight loss programs advocate fasting and other types of dieting as a strategy to increase fitness. People who have established weight loss objectives frequently look for easy, efficient ways to reach them, whether it be Keto diets or intermittent fasting for up to 16–18 hours.

Due to the differences in each person’s anatomy and metabolism, no particular diet or fasting plan can promise rapid weight loss. A new study found no relationship between weight loss and the time between the first and last meals.

Even though the number of calories and the size of the meals were more crucial, the amount of time between meals was a key factor in weight gain or loss.

Intermittent fasting commonly referred to as time-restricted eating, is fairly common. But carefully designed research has not yet shown if restricting the whole eating window during the day aids in weight management. The goal of this experiment was to ascertain the relationship between weight fluctuations and meal intervals.

About 550 persons over the age of 18 from three health systems in Pennsylvania and Maryland were involved in the study. In the two years before study enrolment, participants underwent at least one recorded evaluation of their weight and height.

The goal of this experiment was to ascertain the relationship between weight fluctuations and meal intervals. The Daily24 smartphone app allowed participants to record their eating, sleeping and waking up schedules every 24 hours.

Researchers were able to predict the times between people’s first and last meals of the day as well as the time between eating and going to bed based on the information that participants submitted into the mobile app.

Based on all the data from the completed days, they derived an average for each participant. Meal frequency and total calorie intake were found to be more important factors that affected weight change than meal timing, but because the research was observational, a direct cause-and-effect relationship could not be demonstrated.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *